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Welcome Beth Franczak

Beth Franczak received her Masters of Science in Education from the University of Akron. She is a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor with a supervisory designation (LPCC-S). Beth has been practicing in the community and private practice setting for over 10 years.

Beth uses an eclectic approach to counseling. She believes that the therapeutic relationship is the most important aspect of counseling. She strives to help clients feel as though they are hanging out and chatting in a living room or coffee shop, not in a stuffy clinical setting. Beth incorporates aspects of CBT, DBT, Sand Tray Therapy, and client centered therapy into her work. Her therapy is trauma informed and she has training in trauma focused behavioral therapy and sand tray therapy.

Beth works with adolescents (12 and up) as well as adults. She specializes in treating depression anxiety, adjustment issues, ADHD and trauma. She has a special interest in adoption and enjoys working with all members of the adoption community.

In her free time, Beth enjoys going on adventures with her daughter, reading, doing projects around the house, and watching documentaries to learn cool stuff.

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Welcome Suzanne Savickas

Ty’s Newest Clinician Suzanne Savickas, M.F.A., Ph.D, CRC, LPC

Suzanne incorporates creative interventions such as poetry therapy and using music, along with meditation and mindfulness as a form of stress management. In addition to seeing clients for individual counseling, Suzanne also works with couples. In couple’s therapy, she focuses on relationship concerns, as well as improving communication styles, managing conflict, and addressing and processing attachment issues.

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Mike Marjama’s, MLB Catcher, Struggle with an Eating Disorder

Mike Marjama retired after playing 15 games in Major League Baseball. He then accepted a role as an ambassador to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA).

Check out the video of Mike explaining his struggle.

 

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Mindful Parenting – Key to Happy Healthy Family

Start of the School Year

Summer’s Over and the Kids are Back to School

Congrats parents! You made it to the first day of school. Now you can relax…

On second thought, while you are now off full-time parenting duty, it’s likely that your busy, chaotic weekdays are back in full swing. We forget over the summer that having kids in school equates to hectic mornings, homework to check, extracurricular activities to attend, and all the same regular errands to run. No matter how well you balance life’s challenges, life gets stressful, and it’s normal to feel overwhelmed.

As a parent, the list of ‘to dos’ feels never-ending and always being updated by so many priorities. Rushing from first thing in the morning until we with luck falling asleep in our bed instead of the cozy warm pile of laundry.

Stress

Stress effects our bodies causing the rational part of our brains take a back seat. We start relying on bad habits like yelling, threatening, and issuing ultimatums. The longer we are stressed it can lead to being short-fused, irritable, impulsive,  and actually changing the structure of our brains.

Ignoring stress allows the effects to compound until it finally spills over into our lives impacting:

  • Family
  • Friends
  • Jobs
  • Health

Q. How to address this parenting rut?

A. Mindful Parenting

Mindful parenting is about being aware, acting with intention, and accepting the reality of any given moment. It means being in control of our emotions and how we respond to our children. The magic of this approach is that it validates that none of us are ‘perfect’ or immune to getting angry or frustrated. We simply choose to do the best we can, at any given time. Mindful parenting empowers us to stay calm, see challenges as opportunities, and have fun with our kids. Best of all, it fosters deeper connections, leading to happier, healthier families!

Sounds amazing, right?

Join me the first 3 Saturdays in October for a Mindful Parenting
  • Location: Cuyahoga Falls Office
  • Dates: October 6th, 13th, and 20th
  • Time: 10am – 12pm
  • Cost: $150 for the 3 sessions

This 3-week workshop is designed to introduce and discuss the following:

  • Mindfulness and mindful parenting practices
  • Ways to foster, grow, and sustain resilience in children
  • How to connect, create joy and have fun with your children

Click Here to Register for this workshop, space is limited.

Check out these excellent articles for more information!

 

By: Rachael Muster M.Ed., LPCC-S

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Another Addition to TY

Shirley Sloan-Oberdier, PhD., LPC

We are so excited to welcome Shirley to TY & Associates. Shirley’s experience over the last 9 years working in local schools will provide us with insight to better structure treatment for our younger clients.

Shirley has a PhD. in Counselor Education and Supervision from Kent State University.  In addition to her PhD., she has a Master’s Degree in School Counseling and has worked as an elementary school counselor for 9 years.  Working as a school counselor, Shirley has become comfortable supporting children and families through a wide range of experiences. While obtaining her Professional Counselor license, she appreciated the change of pace as she worked with clients of all ages.  Shirley has experience providing individual, couples, family, and group counseling, as well animal-assisted therapy. Shirley especially enjoys tailoring therapy to support her clients’ specific interests and goals. In her free time, Shirley loves to spend time with her family, friends, and dog, particularly while participating in outdoor activities and traveling with them.

Welcome to Our Newest Clinician

Welcome to TY Counseling

Rachael Muster  M.Ed., LPCC-S

We are thrilled to have Rachael with us at TY. We strive to find clinicians that move forward our vision for client focused care and have no doubts Rachael meets that standard.

Rachael has her Masters Degree in Community Counseling and is a Doctoral Candidate in the Counselor Education and Supervision Program at Kent State University. In addition to her educational background, she is a Licensed Independent Clinical Counselor Supervisor in the state of Ohio. Rachael has experience assessing, diagnosing, and treating a wide range of mental health concerns. Her specialization areas include depression, anxiety, ADHD, trauma, grief/loss, adjustment, crisis intervention, gender/sexuality, and education-related emotional and behavioral concerns. Rachael utilizes a collaborative, strength-based approach to client care.

 

 

Why We All Need to Practice Emotional First Aid

Our Guy Winch – 2014 Ted Talk Emotional First Aid

We’ll go to the doctor when we feel flu-ish or a nagging pain. So why don’t we see a health professional when we feel emotional pain: guilt, loss, loneliness? Too many of us deal with common psychological-health issues on our own, says Guy Winch. But we don’t have to. He makes a compelling case to practice emotional hygiene — taking care of our emotions, our minds, with the same diligence we take care of our bodies.

 This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxLinnaeusUniversity, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

Dealing with Grief

Experiencing Grief

Experiencing grief can be a grueling long path to again feel whole.  There are countless books and websites outlining the 5 stages of grief

  • Denial
  • Pain and Guilt
  • Anger
  • Depression
  • Acceptance

This list although generally true implies that there is a linear progression to grief and once you move past one stage you are done and will not go back to a stage multiple times. Nobody’s grief is like yours and nobody will know how you feel. There is nothing magically anyone including a therapist can do to fix you or make you move past what can be debilitating grief and sadness.

How long should you grieve?

This is your grief and it will be a rollercoaster ride of ups and downs. You may be laughing at the funeral hearing a funny story about your loved one and you may cry a year later when a birthday or anniversary is missed. The saying “Time heals all wounds” ignores that “grieve” is a verb and needs to be an active process.

Active Grieving

There are many ways to actively grieve.

  • Fully accept the loss
    • By accepting the loss, you are able to be open to truly grieving.
  • Talk about your loved one with family and friends
    • Talking about your loved one brings out memories of happier times and relieves the feeling of loss
  • Find time to cry
    • Crying releases chemicals and hormones that relieve stress and can alleviate the effects of minor depression.
  • Turn your loss into action
    • Find a constructive way to honor your loved one in the community

The bereavement period begins after the initial grief and is a process that has no clear end and it may take years to fully mourn the loss of a loved one. Feelings of guilt are normal as you move through bereavement as your loved one enters your thoughts less and less.

Avoiding Bereavement

There is a societal stigma about seeking professional mental health therapy. People consider their mind as something they can control and through personal strength and will they can solve their problems. Being the strong one or working so hard that you don’t have time to think about let alone grieve your loss leads to living years with unresolved trauma that manifests itself in not easily connected health and behavioral issues.

Consider that chronic pain or fatigue maybe rooted in a loss that occurred years before that you thought you dealt with or forgot all about.

If you think you may need help, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Why you shouldn’t?
    • Is it financial?
    • Can’t find the time?
  • How your mourning may impact someone else?
    • I need to be strong for them?
  • Are you responsible to keep everyone happy?
    • If I am sad they will be too
  • Would my loved one want me to feel this way?
    • Would they?

The need to strongly consider professional help if you experience thoughts of suicide or self-harm, serious changes in weight, or are unable to perform daily functions such as getting out of bed or going to work for more than an occasional day.

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